Did your state get screwed?

Treasurer Scott Morrison has dished out a variety of pre-election sweeteners, including $24 billion to be spent on infrastructure projects around the country.

But while some states will be cheering, others didn’t fare so well. With analysis from The Conversation, here’s a state-by-state breakdown of what everyone will receive:

NEW SOUTH WALES

NSW is not a major winner in the 2018 Budget, with only $1.5 billion of the $24 billion earmarked for infrastructure projects heading its way. This includes:

• $400 million for upgrading the Port Botany rail link

• $50 million for investigating the business case for the proposed Badgerys Creek Creek airport rail

• $1 billion on a Pacific Highway upgrade

• $25 million for a new monument commemorating the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s landing

Opposition treasury spokesman Ryan Park declared NSW was the highest taxed state in Australia, accusing the NSW Premier of failing “to stand up for NSW taxpayers”.

Gladys has failed to stand up for NSW. As big business get tax cuts, NSW schools and hospitals get a funding cut! That’s not fair!

— Ryan Park MP (@RyanPark_Keira) May 8, 2018

New South Wales didn’t fare as well as some other states in the Budget. Picture: iStock

New South Wales didn’t fare as well as some other states in the Budget. Picture: iStockSource:istock

VICTORIA

Victoria is arguably the biggest winner of the Budget.

The state will receive a bigger share of the national Goods and Services Tax pool, with revenue growing by a whopping $1.4 billion, or almost 10 per cent, to $17.3 billion.

It will also receive a major infrastructure boost with a total of $7.6 billion allocated, including:

• $5 billion for a Melbourne Airport rail link

• $1.75 billion on a North East toll road

• $500 million on a rail link to Monash University’s Clayton Campus

Only a small portion of the funds have been allocated over the next four years.

Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack, who is also Infrastructure and Transport Minister, said the planned nationwide infrastructure spending would create 50,000 direct and indirect jobs over the next 10 years.

Victoria will receive a major infrastructure boost with a total allocated $7.6 billion, as well as other goodies. Picture: Michael Dodge/Getty Images

Victoria will receive a major infrastructure boost with a total allocated $7.6 billion, as well as other goodies. Picture: Michael Dodge/Getty ImagesSource:Getty Images

QUEENSLAND

Queensland was the second biggest winner in the Budget, with one-fifth of the $24.5 billion spend on roads and rail going to the Sunshine State.

The $5.2 billion allocated will be put towards new infrastructure projects in Queensland, particularly to relieve commuter congestion. These include:

• A $1 billion boost for expanding the M1 motorway between Brisbane and the Gold Coast

• $170 million for the Amberley interchange section of the Cunningham Highway near Ipswich

• $3.3 billion for upgrades to the Bruce Highway

• $390 million for the Sunshine Coast rail line duplication

• $300 million for Brisbane City Council’s Metro transport project

Regional Queensland will also benefit, with $176 million promised for the construction of Rockhampton’s Rookwood Weir.

Queensland was the second biggest winner in the budget. Picture: Richard Gosling

Queensland was the second biggest winner in the budget. Picture: Richard GoslingSource:News Corp Australia

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Western Australia will get a $3.2 billion infrastructure boost. This will include:

• More than $1 billion for WA’s flagship metronet rail network

• $944 million towards tackling road congestion

• $560 million for the Bunbury Outer Ring Road

It will also receive almost $189 million to be spent on the Joondalup and Osborne Park hospital expansions and the Royal Perth Hospital refurbishment.

The Turnbull Government says with that payment WA’s share of the GST in 2018/19 will effectively rise to 50 cents in the dollar.

Western Australia’s boost will include almost $1 billion for tackling road congestion.

Western Australia’s boost will include almost $1 billion for tackling road congestion.Source:News Limited

NORTHERN TERRITORY

The Northern Territory says it is feeling deceived after the federal Budget papers revealed most of the money promised in upgrades to two major outback highways is five years away.

There is no money coming this financial year, then $5 million for each highway in 2019/20, $10 million each in 2020/21, $20 million each in 2021/22.

In 2022/23 there is $65 million for the Buntine and $145 million for the Central Arnhem Highway.

• $180 million to upgrade Central Arnhem Highway

• $100 million to upgrade the Buntine Highway

• Additional money via a $1.5 billion Northern Australia roads fund

• $550 million over five years from 2018-19 for remote indigenous housing

• $259.7 million payment to offset fall in GST share in 2017/18.

Most of the money promised in upgrades to two major highways in the Northern Territory is five years away. Picture: Elise Derwin

Most of the money promised in upgrades to two major highways in the Northern Territory is five years away. Picture: Elise DerwinSource:News Corp Australia

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

South Australia will receive a half-a-billion-dollar boost in GST cash next year.

The Budget has also confirmed a $1.8 billion infrastructure plan for a non-stop South Road.

But The Conversation notes the state has a disproportionately older population compared to the rest of the country.

In theory, Scott Morrison’s measures to increase aged care places and support for in-home care should thus benefit this state more than any other.

But at the same time, the Budget does little to directly tackle economic inequality in the state.

While South Australia has the highest youth unemployment in the nation, the state’s Newstart allowance has not been given an increase, nor has the Treasurer flagged any specific measures to help young people into the housing market.

South Australia will receive a half-a-billion-dollar boost in GST cash next year, but the Budget does little to directly tackle economic inequality in the state.

South Australia will receive a half-a-billion-dollar boost in GST cash next year, but the Budget does little to directly tackle economic inequality in the state.Source:Supplied

TASMANIA

Tasmania’s share of the Budget pie has been described as a “mixed bag”.

The southern state will receive an infrastructure package of almost $1 billion, including $461 million in funds for a replacement Bridgewater Bridge, $400 million in safety upgrades for the Bass Highway, and statewide railway works.

Hobart-based independent MP Andrew Wilkie said the Budget was a “good deal for some” but the state needed more than just election sweeteners.

“It’s a mixed bag,” he said in a statement. “The government needs to understand that a better deal for Tasmania goes beyond just transport.

“It’s disappointing that there was effectively no boost for science and research in Hobart including reversing the devastating cuts to the CSIRO and the Australian Antarctic Division.”

But the state’s peak business body said the Budget tax cuts would help Tasmanians more than most.

“We have a lower average income than other states, so many thousands of Tasmanians will benefit,” Tasmanian Chamber of Commerce and Industry CEO Michael Bailey said.

Tasmania’s share of the Budget pie has been described as a “mixed bag”. Picture: iStock

Tasmania’s share of the Budget pie has been described as a “mixed bag”. Picture: iStockSource:istock

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